Rebecca Randall

Doric is a dialect spoken in the Northeast of Scotland. It is taught through stories, passed from mouth to ear. When hearing from passionate Doric speakers they spoke of stories told by their grandparents emphasising how special their heritage is to them. This highlighted the importance of encouraging interaction and including social spaces within the site.

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It is unknown where the term doric originated from, but it is speculated that it was taken from the dorians – a term used in ancient Greece to refer to a group of people out-with the cities that spoke in their own dialect. When English became a subject that was studied within schools ‘doric’ became a derogatory term, associated with uneducated, lower-class families. It has a strong connection with the fishing and farming communities in Scotland, which also contributed to the perception of the dialect as being separated from the city. The cultural centre is a way of bringing Doric into the heart of the city, a joining of the city and the countryside.

Doric’s heritage is as a spoken language and therefore there is a lack of standardisation and there are inconsistencies in pronunciation as you move through different regions. They need a space for archives of poems and text, a space to record and store media and a space to perform works live. The journey of their culture and the challenges they now face became the foundation of my design and I strive to design a new cultural hub for the Doric community.

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